HTML5 DRM finally makes it as an official W3C Recommendation — “The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the industry body that oversees development of HTML and related Web standards, has today published the Encrypted Media Extensions (EME) specification as a Recommendation, marking its final blessing as an official Web standard. Final approval came after the W3C’s members voted 58.4 percent to approve the spec, 30.8 percent to oppose, with 10.8 percent abstaining.”

Court Rules Copyright is Not a “Use It or Lose It” Right — Stephen Carlisle discusses the recent Southern District Court of New York decision in Penguin Random House v Colting, where Judge Rakoff rejected defendant’s fair use defense regarding unauthorized children versions of classic novels like Breakfast at Tiffany’s and 2001: A Space Odyssey.

CreativeFuture Pushes Back on Internet Industry’s Claim That They Are ‘New Faces’ of Content — “In a letter to Lighthizer, Ruth Vitale, the CEO of CreativeFuture, wrote that ‘while I would take issue with anyone claiming to represent all ‘the new faces of the American content industry,’ I can comfortably tell you that CreativeFuture represents many of the true faces.’ She added that they ‘respectfully disagree with the views expressed by those tech trade associations.'”

Open Markets Opens Shop After Google Dust-Up — The Authors Guild writes, “We’re hopeful that the attention that incidents like these bring to Internet monopolies’ control of our information infrastructure and the related harm they bring to the creative industries is part of a growing recognition that the regulation of Internet giants like Google and Amazon may be required to keep intact the free flow of information in this country.”

Using Things, Defining Property — GMU Law professor Chris Newman this week posted a forthcoming paper on the definition of property, including intellectual property. Smart stuff, as expected.

Artist Rights Watch writes of the above trailer, “If you’re not aware of this indie film about producer Mark Hallman and his Congress House Studios, you really should check it out.  Rain Perry tells the story that we all know from the point of view of a great craftsman. You can rent or buy the picture directly from the film maker here.”